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Sebar Berita Palsu Koronavirus, 5 Pemilik Akaun Media Sosial Disiasat

Tukang Tulis|30-1-2020 10:40 AM Komen: 14
Maklumat palsu berkaitan koronavirus yang tular dalam media sosial. Kredit foto: Facebook
Empat akaun Facebook dan satu kumpulan WhatsApp disiasat oleh polis berhubung penularan berita palsu tentang wabak koronavirus di Malaysia.

Memetik laporan mStar Online, empat akaun Facebook itu adalah Mr Kong Tuck Wah, Ibu Yati, Roti Sardeen dan Gabungan Anak Terengganu (Original).

Manakala, kumpulan WhatsApp yang tidak dinamakan itu dipercayai menyebarkan berita palsu tentang kematian mengejut banduan di penjara Sandakan, Sabah kononnya akibat koronavirus.

Pengarah Jabatan Siasatan Jenayah (JSJ) Bukit Aman, Datuk Huzir Mohamed menjelaskan, kertas siasatan dibuka terhadap laman Facebook Mr Kong Tuck Wah di bawah Seksyen 203 (A) Kanun Keseksaan (Pendedahan Maklumat).

Kredit foto: Facebook
Sekiranya sabit kesalahan, pemilik akaun Facebook tersebit boleh dikenakan hukuman denda maksimum RM1 juta atau penjara maksimum setahun atau kedua-duanya sekali.

Tiga akaun Facebook yang lain disiasat berikutan memuat naik kenyataan yang boleh menggugat ketenteraman awam.

"Kes disiasat di bawah Seksyen 505 (b) Kanun Keseksaan (Menyebabkan ketakutan atau kegentaran awam atau kepada mana-mana golongan awam) yang memperuntukan hukuman penjara sehingga dua tahun atau denda atau kedua-duanya," katanya.

Kredit foto: Facebook
Kelima-lima kes berkenaan turut disiasat dibawah Seksyen  233 Akta Komunikasi dan Multimedia 1998 (pengunaan tidak wajar kemudahan rangkaian) yang memperuntukkan hukuman denda maksimum RM100,000 atau penjara maksimum setahun atau kedua-duanya.

"Polis juga tidak akan teragak-agak untuk mengambil tindakan terhadap mana-mana individu yang didapati dengan sengaja mensensasikan isu berkait virus ini," katanya.

Semak dahulu kesahihan maklumat yang diterima dan jangan sewenang-wenangnya menyebarkan maklumat yang boleh mencetuskan panik dalam kalangan masyarakat. - CARI

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Quote MissVixen 31-1-2020 02:41 PM
HELPFUL RUMORS

Chinas top court says it was a mistake to quell early rumors about the Wuhan virus
January 31, 2020

Tripti Lahiri
Jane Li
By Tripti Lahiri & Jane Li

FROM OUR OBSESSION
Because China
Even small changes in China have global effects.

Chinas Supreme Peoples Court has often been at the forefront of the countrys crackdown on rumors. In 2013, it introduced sentences of three years for libelous posts, including those deemed to be damaging the national image. Now, in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, its sending a more tempered message.

Chinese newspaper Beijing News this week (link in Chinese) published the story of a local doctor who said he had been summoned by Wuhan police because of information he shared in a medical school alumni group on Dec. 30. He had told the group there were seven cases of pneumonia in a hospital from SARS, a virus that caused an epidemic in China in 2003. He later clarified that the virus in question was still being identified, according to the South China Morning Post. Police made the doctor sign a letter promising not to disclose further information about the outbreak, the Post said, adding that the doctor later became infected himself. On Dec. 31, the city disclosed the presence of 27 pneumonia cases of unknown origin.

On Tuesday (Jan. 28), an article by a judge published on the top courts social media account (link in Chinese) noted that if law enforcement hadnt been so quick to take action to quell those rumors, China might be in a better position in its battle against the new virus. The virus has infected (link in Chinese) more than 9,700 people in the countrymore than SARSand killed at least 213. The article said that while some of the information in the messages about the pneumonia cases was inaccurate, on the whole the information was not a fabrication:

If the public listened to this rumor at that time, and adopted measures such as wearing a mask, strict disinfection, and avoiding going to the wildlife market based on panic about SARS, this may have been a better way to prevent and control the new pneumonia As long as the information is basically true, the publishers and disseminators are not intentionally malicious, and the behavior objectively has not caused serious harm, we should maintain a tolerant attitude towards such false information.

While not a ruling or an official statement, the article offers clues to the courts thinking on the topic.

Before the court weighed in, Wuhan authorities hadnt disclosed what sort of rumors they had taken action against. But after the courts article, Wuhan police said on social network Weibo (link in Chinese) on Wednesday (Jan. 29) that they had received complaints about misinformation after the city announced the outbreak. Police said they summoned the people in the group because they referred to the cluster of pneumonia cases as being SARS, which was false, and discussed the matter with them but didnt punish or fine them. The current outbreak was identified on Jan. 7 as a new type of coronavirus, making it a member of the SARS family, but distinct from the strain that caused nearly 800 deaths in 2003.

On social media, many have noted with anger that the Wuhan police announced they had taken action against pneumonia rumors at a time when the city should have been entirely focused on warning and protecting residents. Earlier this month, a lawyer wrote on Weibo that it was chilling that the government now thinks citizens who exchange information that they cannot necessarily verify are the same as those who intentionally spread rumors. The commentary was shared 5 million times before being deleted.

The top court said that information disclosure is the cure for dealing with the situations in which rumors arise, while law enforcement action just treats the symptoms. It also tacitly acknowledged what many in China believethat so-called rumors are often quashed for being inconvenient or for touching on politically sensitive matters, rather than for being untrue:

Rumors are stopped by transparency. Based on their anxiety about their own safety, there is a certain degree of panic in the face of public health emergencies, which is normal and should be understood. If, at such a moment, relevant information is made public in a timely and comprehensive manner, peoples doubts will naturally be reduced. However, if the information is not disclosed in a timely and transparent manner, it is often easy for the masses to listen to and spread various rumors based on their social interaction circles and their own life experiences if the rumors are repeatedly confirmed by reality, the masses will naturally choose to believe the rumors in the face of emergencies.

Many have noted that the government in Beijing seems to be quite happy to direct rising public anger at local authorities in central Hubei province. Wuhan mayor Zhou Xianwang said in a TV interview this week that that he didnt disclose information about the virus in a timely manner, adding that he needed authorization from higher up to do so. A health commission chief in another city in the province with a high number of infections was fired yesterday, after the state-run broadcaster aired footage of her stumbling over questions about availability of beds and test kits.

The courts criticism of the Wuhan polices handling of rumors may just be the latest example of deflecting anger. Meanwhile, it made it clear that the court still considers many kinds of rumors actionable. Deliberately sharing inflated numbers of deaths in order to sow panic, or recklessly casting aspersions on the national governments handling of epidemics, should be punished as criminal offenses, the judge wrote.


Lain-lain Komen

Quote alesandra 30-1-2020 10:45 AM
hari ni terima  lagi benda bodoh kat wasap. yg konon kes kat  bentong pahang.siap ada  record suara lagi.taktau nak maki sapa.. yg yg share atau yg mulakan..
Quote papadomku 30-1-2020 11:39 AM
Kenapa ye ada jenis org yg suka reka cerita palsu camni? Apa yg dorang dapat eh? Tak faham aku
Quote FailFish 30-1-2020 11:48 AM
yang tu semua baca pun boleh tau sgt obvious fake
Quote Ina8895 30-1-2020 11:59 AM
alesandra: hari ni terima  lagi benda bodoh kat wasap. yg konon kes kat  bentong pahang.siap ada  record suara lagi.taktau nak maki sapa.. yg yg share atau yg mu ...


Bagi je link artikel ni kat dia.
Quote Ina8895 30-1-2020 11:59 AM
alesandra: hari ni terima  lagi benda bodoh kat wasap. yg konon kes kat  bentong pahang.siap ada  record suara lagi.taktau nak maki sapa.. yg yg share atau yg mu ...


Bagi je link artikel ni kat dia.
Quote husna_amal 30-1-2020 12:05 PM
Buat apa lah segelintir orang sebarkan berita yang tak berapa sahih. Jadilah netizen yang bijak sikit. Kan dah terperangkap dengan masalah dan dikehendaki polis.
Quote Ina8895 30-1-2020 12:47 PM
Yang sebar janji palsu masa pru14 dulu tak kena siasat ke?
Quote jaja8 30-1-2020 01:58 PM
hurm banyak sangat..lagi2 yg share2 kat whatsaap tu baca macam angin lalu je
Quote BacaDalamDiam 30-1-2020 04:53 PM
Quote zacks 30-1-2020 05:48 PM
papadomku replied at 30-1-2020 11:39 AM
Kenapa ye ada jenis org yg suka reka cerita palsu camni? Apa yg dorang dapat eh? Tak faham aku

Saiberteruper umno bnpas punya keja ni colanfirm lah
Quote dizekni 30-1-2020 05:55 PM
Bodo
yang sebar manifesto palsu tak ambik tindakan pulak

siap bayar gaji menteri ribu2

bodo
Quote Ina8895 30-1-2020 06:53 PM
zacks replied at 30-1-2020 05:48 PM
Saiberteruper umno bnpas punya keja ni colanfirm lah

PH bodoh kuat kencing
Quote biozipstar 31-1-2020 10:49 AM
aku x faham konsep rajin nak pass2 cite yg takde ujung pangkal.
Quote MissVixen 31-1-2020 02:41 PM
HELPFUL RUMORS

Chinas top court says it was a mistake to quell early rumors about the Wuhan virus
January 31, 2020

Tripti Lahiri
Jane Li
By Tripti Lahiri & Jane Li

FROM OUR OBSESSION
Because China
Even small changes in China have global effects.

Chinas Supreme Peoples Court has often been at the forefront of the countrys crackdown on rumors. In 2013, it introduced sentences of three years for libelous posts, including those deemed to be damaging the national image. Now, in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, its sending a more tempered message.

Chinese newspaper Beijing News this week (link in Chinese) published the story of a local doctor who said he had been summoned by Wuhan police because of information he shared in a medical school alumni group on Dec. 30. He had told the group there were seven cases of pneumonia in a hospital from SARS, a virus that caused an epidemic in China in 2003. He later clarified that the virus in question was still being identified, according to the South China Morning Post. Police made the doctor sign a letter promising not to disclose further information about the outbreak, the Post said, adding that the doctor later became infected himself. On Dec. 31, the city disclosed the presence of 27 pneumonia cases of unknown origin.

On Tuesday (Jan. 28), an article by a judge published on the top courts social media account (link in Chinese) noted that if law enforcement hadnt been so quick to take action to quell those rumors, China might be in a better position in its battle against the new virus. The virus has infected (link in Chinese) more than 9,700 people in the countrymore than SARSand killed at least 213. The article said that while some of the information in the messages about the pneumonia cases was inaccurate, on the whole the information was not a fabrication:

If the public listened to this rumor at that time, and adopted measures such as wearing a mask, strict disinfection, and avoiding going to the wildlife market based on panic about SARS, this may have been a better way to prevent and control the new pneumonia As long as the information is basically true, the publishers and disseminators are not intentionally malicious, and the behavior objectively has not caused serious harm, we should maintain a tolerant attitude towards such false information.

While not a ruling or an official statement, the article offers clues to the courts thinking on the topic.

Before the court weighed in, Wuhan authorities hadnt disclosed what sort of rumors they had taken action against. But after the courts article, Wuhan police said on social network Weibo (link in Chinese) on Wednesday (Jan. 29) that they had received complaints about misinformation after the city announced the outbreak. Police said they summoned the people in the group because they referred to the cluster of pneumonia cases as being SARS, which was false, and discussed the matter with them but didnt punish or fine them. The current outbreak was identified on Jan. 7 as a new type of coronavirus, making it a member of the SARS family, but distinct from the strain that caused nearly 800 deaths in 2003.

On social media, many have noted with anger that the Wuhan police announced they had taken action against pneumonia rumors at a time when the city should have been entirely focused on warning and protecting residents. Earlier this month, a lawyer wrote on Weibo that it was chilling that the government now thinks citizens who exchange information that they cannot necessarily verify are the same as those who intentionally spread rumors. The commentary was shared 5 million times before being deleted.

The top court said that information disclosure is the cure for dealing with the situations in which rumors arise, while law enforcement action just treats the symptoms. It also tacitly acknowledged what many in China believethat so-called rumors are often quashed for being inconvenient or for touching on politically sensitive matters, rather than for being untrue:

Rumors are stopped by transparency. Based on their anxiety about their own safety, there is a certain degree of panic in the face of public health emergencies, which is normal and should be understood. If, at such a moment, relevant information is made public in a timely and comprehensive manner, peoples doubts will naturally be reduced. However, if the information is not disclosed in a timely and transparent manner, it is often easy for the masses to listen to and spread various rumors based on their social interaction circles and their own life experiences if the rumors are repeatedly confirmed by reality, the masses will naturally choose to believe the rumors in the face of emergencies.

Many have noted that the government in Beijing seems to be quite happy to direct rising public anger at local authorities in central Hubei province. Wuhan mayor Zhou Xianwang said in a TV interview this week that that he didnt disclose information about the virus in a timely manner, adding that he needed authorization from higher up to do so. A health commission chief in another city in the province with a high number of infections was fired yesterday, after the state-run broadcaster aired footage of her stumbling over questions about availability of beds and test kits.

The courts criticism of the Wuhan polices handling of rumors may just be the latest example of deflecting anger. Meanwhile, it made it clear that the court still considers many kinds of rumors actionable. Deliberately sharing inflated numbers of deaths in order to sow panic, or recklessly casting aspersions on the national governments handling of epidemics, should be punished as criminal offenses, the judge wrote.


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